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Among other things: I’ve never met anyone in the software industry who is happy with the hiring process, and that includes everyone who’s designed the process.

Nobody seems to have a solution to separating the potential stars from the mehs, and anyone who claims they do either doesn’t have enough perspective to understand the difficulty of the problem (young interviewers who have been trained in one particular hiring style seem to be blessed with the arrogance of blind faith), or they’ve perfected the art of hiring the mediocre (a sufficiently rigorous process can probably rule out almost all the disastrous hires, but will likely also lose a few stars…and it’s finding the stars that is the problem).

Those aren’t the guys you’re going to bend over backwards to hire to frame your walls.

The whole story seems to be built on the premise that the only skill a carpenter has is the ability to drive a nail straight, making any notion of an “interview” farcical. There’s a hell of a difference between a framer, a cabinet-maker, and a furniture-maker. There is, however, a lot of brown stain, and brown shingling, and brown brick. Questions like this are exactly how a good interviewer separates a blinkered newbie from an expert with perspective.

When Apple made a phone, it turned out it wasn’t really competing in the handset business; it was competing for the next dominant personal computing platform.

The more I think about an Apple car, the more I think that it might be the basis of their future “computing environment”: a space that is completely aware of and responsive to its occupant(s).

I call it the fallacy of causation, or the fallacy of the single cause.

I don’t think we’re wired very well to reason about outcomes that result from many different inputs.

Of course, there are carpenters who are creative craftsmen of the first order.

The main premise of this complaint about programming interviews is that a programmer is a programmer is a programmer, and the details don’t matter, and that’s straight-up bullshit. If the overall software system will be distributed, then the architecture needs to take rollout into consideration.

Shrugging off context is only a professional qualification for field-goal kickers. I don’t think it’s used much (if at all) for stud wall construction, but it is occasionally used for post-and-beam construction, which involves either metal brackets or traditional cut joinery, and for nonstructural finishings.

Inevitably the media seizes upon a single person, or a cohesive group all of whom are described as conspiring together to cause the event.

Blame seldom (if ever) falls on multiple villains: the finger should point in one direction and one direction only.

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